Science & Environment

Science and environmental reporting on news and community topics. Science coverage is occasionally provided by community members.

Sports Fishing Report: September 17, 2018

Sep 17, 2018

Unalaska Bay/Dutch Harbor Road System

Issued September 17, 2018

Silvers are going strong in most local rivers and in particular at Captain’s Bay. Silver runs should still have another two weeks of decent fishing! ADFG in Kodiak is looking for volunteers to do stream surveys this fall for road system streams, contact us if you are interested!

Regulation reminders:

John Ryan / KUCB

 

A rat is loose on St. Paul Island. And that’s a big deal because the Pribilof Islands have always been rat free.

Steve Delehanty, Refuge Manager for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, says rats bring significant economic and environmental concerns.

“They damage people’s property. They damage food storage. They damage ship and boat electronics. They damage wildlife,” Delehanty said. “They eat birds, they eat bird eggs, they eat chicks. They can also transmit diseases.”

Sports Fishing Report: September 7, 2018

Sep 7, 2018

  Issued September 7, 2018

Silvers are in at many local creeks. Town Creek and Captain’s Bay have been good along with Nateekin and Broad Bay. Crabbing and halibut fishing can still be good through September as well! Be sure to make note of sport fishing regulations for the area the you plan to fish as they do change throughout the season and between rivers in the area.

Regulation reminders:

KUCB

Unalaska's first drone-operated salmon survey is now underway.

The Unalaska Native Fishermen's Association (UNFA) has hired Andy Dietrick — of Aleutian Aerial LLC — to capture video of salmon habitat at Unalaska Lake, Summer Bay Lake, and Morris Cove.

The goal is to estimate the size of the island's largely unmonitored fish populations. To collect that data, Dietrick is filming in a 35-millimeter format that approaches "cinema quality." 

CAFF

This week, Unalaska is hosting an international gathering of scientists, wildlife managers, and indigenous leaders — all focused on biodiversity in the circumpolar north.

It's a meeting of the Arctic Council's working group for the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), currently chaired by the United States.

The group conducts habitat research, tracks native and invasive species, and encourages local engagement in environmental issues across the world's eight Arctic nations.

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