Hope McKenney

Reporter

Born in rural Northern California, Hope started as a reporter and producer at KZYX in Mendocino County. She then worked at Kichwa Hatari ⁠— the first Quechua language radio station in the U.S., based in New York ⁠— and KQED in San Francisco. 

She has lived in Bolivia, Peru, and Cuba, and is now excited to cover the beautiful Aleutians.  

Ways to Connect

Newscast: 11/23/20

17 hours ago

Officials reported six positive cases of COVID-19 in Cold Bay on Saturday; Alaska set another single-day record for new COVID-19 cases this weekend; and the state's largest barge operator is raising prices at the end of January.

City of Cold Bay

Officials reported six positive cases of COVID-19 in Cold Bay on Saturday. Because the individuals are residents of the Alaska Peninsula village, the state will report them as positive cases for the Aleutians East Borough, according to Eastern Aleutian Tribes.

The regional tribal healthcare provider said in a statement that upon receiving the positive test results, the unnamed individuals were placed in isolation.

The healthcare provider is working with city and state officials to ensure precautions are taken to protect anyone who may have been exposed to the coronavirus.

Newscast: 11/19/20

Nov 19, 2020

The Unalaska City School District and the PCR are working together to provide after school programs to aid the social and mental wellbeing of students during the pandemic; despite a disappointing salmon season and continuous ecosystem-wide change in the Bering Sea, recent pink salmon runs across the region have been much larger than ever before; and since late June, Unalaska's Museum of the Aleutians has been publishing a series of Instagram posts about historically and locally significant places on the island.

NOAA FishWatch

In a new study, scientists have linked warming Arctic temperatures, changing wind patterns, and shifting currents to movement of commercially valuable Alaska pollock in the Bering Sea.

The Bering Sea has seen the loss of a summer cold water barrier in recent years, which used to keep pollock from spreading out and moving north.

But while scientists are seeing drastic shifts in pollock movement patterns, further research needs to be conducted to know what the changes mean for communities like Unalaska/Dutch Harbor and the billion-dollar pollock industry.

Newscast: 11/18/20

Nov 18, 2020

In a new study, Russian and American scientists have linked warming Arctic temperatures, changing wind patterns, and shifting currents to movement of commercially valuable Alaska pollock in the Bering Sea; there will be no jury trials in Alaska's courthouses until at least Jan. 4; and the Anchorage Museum launched a new exhibit this month celebrating the contributions, legacies and strength of women from the circumpolar north.

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