health

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Thanks to an emergency loan, Unalaska's clinic won't have to shut its doors in May.

The City Council voted unanimously April 9 to lend $500,000 to Iliuliuk Family and Health Services, which requested help after projecting its 9th deficit in 10 years.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Unalaska's cash-strapped clinic is one step closer to receiving $500,000 in emergency funds that'll help keep its doors open.

Last week, the City Council unanimously advanced legislation that would provide the nonprofit Iliuliuk Family and Health Services (IFHS) with a loan to be repaid in 10 years.

City Manager Thomas E. Thomas drew up the agreement, with help from the city attorney.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Unalaska's clinic has made another emergency request for city funds — less than a year after the nonprofit community health center was reportedly back in the black.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

After less than a year and half on the job, James Kaech has resigned as executive director of the Iliuliuk Family & Health Services (IFHS).

Kaech submitted his letter of resignation to the clinic’s board of directors on Dec. 22.

“I just wanted to be closer to family and grandkids,” Kaech said. “I’m here to support in any way I can, as the long as the board or anybody in the community [wants me]. People have my cell phone and I’ll still have the same number, so feel free to give me a call if you need anything.”

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

After a decade of deep budget deficits, Unalaska's clinic is back in the black.

"We closed the fiscal year to the positive — to $26,407," said Director James Kaech of Iliuliuk Family and Health Services. "That's huge when we were projecting a loss of more than $700,000."

Kaech said that turnaround is the result of a year spent revamping the clinic's financial strategy and rebuilding the community's confidence in local health care.

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