Science & Environment

Science and environmental reporting on news and community topics. Science coverage is occasionally provided by community members.

Kristin Cieciel/NOAA

 

Do jellyfish affect Bering Sea fisheries? And if so, how?

That’s what Yale University’s Jonathan Rutter wants to find out. The college senior is conducting a survey to learn more about the gelatinous creatures directly from fishermen.

 

“What are these impacts that jellyfish have on Bering Sea fisheries?" Rutter said. "And those impacts could be economic- or nuisance-based. I’m going in it with a pretty open mind.”

 

Courtesy of Melissa Good

 

In the past year, two ice seals have turned up in Unalaska — way outside their natural range. The first was spotted in late February 2017 and less than a year later another was photographed near town.

SeaGrant's Melissa Good says ringed seals don’t belong in Unalaska.

“Ringed seals are ice associated seals so they live and kind of work around the ice,” she said. “They want to haul out on the ice for pupping, molting, and resting.”

Courtesy Noel Pelland/Proceedings of the Tribunal of Arbitration at Paris, Volume 7.

 

In the late 1800s, the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury sent Captain C. L. Hooper to the Pribilof Islands to learn as much as he could about the northern fur seal from the Alaska Native people who lived there. At the time, the fur trade was big business.

One of the lessons he recorded was that the seals are known to travel with the wind when possible. Now scientists have the data to back up that traditional knowledge.

KUCB

Scientists have monitored the salmon run at McLees Lake for 17 years.

But now, they’re in danger of losing the weir that helps them count sockeye at one of Unalaska’s most popular spots for subsistence fishing.

"We are at the end of our funding cycle with the Alaska Sustainable Salmon Fund," said Biologist Lisa Fox of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. "We don’t know yet if we have funding for that weir this upcoming season."

NASA

 

Scientists found an enriched uranium particle over the Aleutian Islands and don’t know where it came from. In 20 years of aerial surveys, it’s the first time researchers have detected a particle like this. It’s not naturally occurring uranium – it’s the kind that might be found in nuclear bombs or fuel.

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