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pollock

Zoë Sobel / KUCB

 

Unalaska welcomed two Japanese-flagged vessels to port this week — one devoted to Arctic research, the other connected to controversial commercial whaling.

The first is the Oshoro Maru V, a research vessel for Hokkaido University's school of fisheries sciences.

 

Professor Toru Hirawake is the chief scientist onboard.

 

NOAA Fishwatch

A month into pollock "B" season, fishermen have caught about 16 percent of the quota.

That's a bit of a slow start, according to Krista Milani of the National Marine Fisheries Service. At this time last year, the fleet had taken about 22 percent of the total harvest.

So far, 67 boats have participated in the fishery — a dozen fewer than last year.

NOAA Fishwatch

Bering Sea fishermen are now trawling for one of Alaska’s most profitable catches.

Pollock "B" season opened Sunday with a total quota of 731,804 metric tons.

That's about one percent higher than last year, according to Krista Milani, a groundfish manager for the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Zoe Sobel/KUCB

For decades, the Northern Victor was a nomadic vessel.

It spent part of the year processing pollock in Unalaska’s Beaver Inlet. And the rest, it spent traveling back and forth from Seattle for maintenance.

That finally changed this season, when Icicle Seafoods had the boat drop its vagabond act and settle down at the dock for good.

KUCB stopped by the Northern Victor recently to see how its new home has affected business.

It’s a windy day on the Unalaska spit, with gusts reaching more than 90 miles per hour.

NOAA FishWatch

Saturday at noon is the start of A-season for Pollock. Krista Milani of the National Marine Fisheries Services says the total allowable catch (TAC) this year is about 1 percent bigger than last year.

“Last year [the TAC] was 1.345 million metric tons and this year its going to be 1.364 million metric tons," Milandi said. "It is a slight increase from last year.”

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