RAVN AIR GROUP

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

 RavnAir Group’s two regional airlines will continue flying in Alaska after a Southern California commuter service struck a last-minute deal to buy their operating certificates out of bankruptcy, outbidding a group of veteran Alaska transportation executives.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

A Southern California commuter flight service, Float Shuttle, is set to take over the large planes and regional service once operated by RavnAir Group, which declared bankruptcy amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Alaska's largest rural air carrier, the bankrupt RavnAir Group, aborted a planned auction Wednesday for its remaining core assets, casting doubt over the fate of the company's 1,300 employees and the future of flight service to the array of communities it once served.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

RavnAir Group says it's received nearly 30 bids to buy the airline, or pieces of it, out of bankruptcy, its attorney said at a Thursday court hearing.

Five bidders are interested in buying the company intact, as a "going concern," Ravn attorney Tobias Keller said at the hearing in Delaware federal bankruptcy court. There were also nearly a dozen offers to buy "substantial assets" from Ravn — not the whole business, but more than $1 million, Keller said.

Other bids were for a single plane or a particular lease, he added.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

RavnAir Group will continue serving Unalaska, with four scheduled flights a week, even as the coronavirus pandemic has forced it to end service to all but a handful of its 115 communities. 

"At this time, RavnAir Group intends to continue flights four times a week to Unalaska, with the potential for charter flights," Deb Reinwand, a RavnAir spokesperson, said in an emailed statement. 

The news comes after 24 hours of confusion about RavnAir's plans for Unalaska and Dutch Harbor, one of the country's biggest fishing ports.

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