eruption

courtesy of Burke Mees / Alaska Volcano Observatory

 

Scientists have downgraded the alert level at one of Alaska's most active volcanoes after a sustained pause in volcanic unrest. 

This comes after the Alaska Volcano Observatory  raised Cleveland Volcano's alert level to "advisory" early in the summer, after a short-lived explosion on the evening of June 1.

Alaska Volcano Observatory

 

An explosion at one of Alaska's most active volcanoes has led scientists to raise its alert level to "watch." This comes after the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) lowered Cleveland Volcano's alert level in early May after nearly a year and a half of inactivity.

Cleveland is located on an uninhabited island in the central Aleutians, west of Umnak Island. Around 10:30 p.m. on Monday, the AVO detected a small explosion that sent an ash plume 22,000 feet, traveling to the south.

Aaron Merculief

 Updated 4:15 p.m. 1/07/20

Ash eruption at Shishaldin Volcano continues and has intensified as shown in satellite and lightning data. The Aviation Color Code has increased to "red" and Alert Level has increased to "warning."

Hans Schwaiger, a geophysicist with the Alaska Volcano Observatory, said the volcano - 58 miles southwest of Cold Bay – began erupting again this morning, and had sent an ash cloud 27,000 feet that is drifting to the east-northeast, as of 1 p.m.

Alaska Volcano Observatory

Shishaldin Volcano had an eruption Friday morning that produced an ash cloud approximately 24,000 feet and volcanic lightning.

Matt Haney, a geophysicist with the Alaska Volcano Observatory, said the volcano  – located about 58 miles southwest of Cold Bay – has been active since July.