Lost Villages

Lost Villages Project participants visit Makushin Village in 2009.
Credit Lauren Adams

During World War II, the Aleutian Islands became a front line in the Pacific theater. The arrival of war resulted in mass relocation of the Unangax̂, the indigenous people of the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands. Several villages were never resettled. Evacuation had a profound impact on culture and identity, which continues to resonate today. "Tanadgusim Adan Chiilulix (a Journey Home): Revisiting the Lost Villages of the Aleutian Islands" tells the story of a project that brought Unangax̂ survivors of World War II back to the communities they were forced to leave during the war — and then never allowed to resettle.

KUCB coverage of the Lost Villages Project is supported in part by a grant from the Alaska Humanities Forum and the National Endowment for the Humanities, a federal agency. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this coverage does not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

MUSEUM OF THE ALEUTIANS

The Museum of the Aleutians is opening a new exhibit June 14.

"Chiilulix: The Long Journey Home" will explore the history of four Aleutian communities that were never resettled after the evacuation of World War II — as well as the Lost Villages Project that eventually helped Unangax̂ survivors and descendants to reconnect with those places. 

Pages