RavnAir Group

Hope McKenney/KUCB

 

Ravn Alaska says it could resume scheduled flights between Anchorage and Unalaska in two weeks, but there's at least one hurdle left to overcome.

 

On Friday — for the first time since RavnAir Group filed for bankruptcy earlier this year  — a DeHavilland Dash 8 airplane landed on Tom Madsen Airport's short 4,500-foot runway. And the appearance of a Ravn-branded aircraft could be a sign that regular commercial flights between Anchorage and Unalaska are on the horizon.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Two airlines are vying to resume direct flights connecting Unalaska with Anchorage. Servant Air and Float Alaska have each made filings stating they would like to fill the gap left by Ravn which filed for bankruptcy earlier this year. 

Ravn Alaska

 

The company that bought Ravn's core assets initially hoped to relaunch operations around this time, but the new owners now say that they hope to resume flying in another month, in mid-September.

Rob McKinney is the new chief executive of the rebranded company, Ravn Alaska, and he says some unforeseen challenges delayed the relaunch of service to the Aleutian Islands, Bristol Bay, and Kenai Peninsula.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

After RavnAir Group cancelled the auction process to sell off its assets earlier this month, a Southern California commuter flight service — FLOAT Shuttle — struck a deal with the bankrupt airline to buy the Part 121 federal operating certificates from Ravn-operated airlines PenAir and Corvus. 

Berett Wilber/KUCB

 

Alaska Seaplanes announced Tuesday it intends to relaunch passenger air service on routes formerly served by RavnAir Group, which declared bankruptcy earlier this year amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Juneau-based Alaska Seaplanes had previously put in an offer to buy the Part 121 federal operating certificates from Ravn-operated airlines PenAir and Corvus — which allow scheduled service to rural hubs in the Aleutian Islands, Bristol Bay, and the Kenai Peninsula. 

 

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