Ounalashka Corporation

Hope McKenney/KUCB

The Ounalashka Corporation (OC) announced Thursday that all burns are banned on their property without prior consent.  

This decision follows two large brush fires that broke out on their land in the past two weeks. 

CEO Chris Salts said they don't want to ban fires outright, but want Unalaskans to get permission ahead of time so the corporation can monitor burning and try to prevent brush fires. 

Courtesy Malcolm Herstand / Alaska Volcano Observatory

The City of Unalaska isn't rushing into a geothermal energy agreement with OC/Chena Power.

While the private company had asked local officials to sign a 30-year power deal by the end of the month, City Manager Erin Reinders said they won't make a decision until they have more information.

"I think some of these larger concepts — how is this going to work? — need to be discussed before we really dig in to the very specific details of a power purchase agreement," said Reinders. 

Courtesy Malcolm Herstand / Alaska Volcano Observatory

A private company looking to develop geothermal energy at Makushin Volcano wants the City of Unalaska to commit to a 30-year power deal by the end of the month.

At a special meeting last week, the City Council heard an update from consultant Mike Hubbard on the energy project proposed by OC/Chena Power.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

Engineers have taken down one of Unalaska's four meteorological (MET) towers after it was damaged in a fall storm. Its loss isn't expected to compromise the city's ongoing energy study testing the feasibility of a local wind farm.

On Hog Island, workers have been preparing a MET tower for winter, anchoring it deeper into the ground. That way, when high winds blow and heavy rain falls, it'll stand up to the elements and avoid damage.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

After decades of false starts, geothermal power may be coming to Unalaska.

The Ounalashka Corporation and Fairbanks-based Chena Power, LLC have formed a company to develop a geothermal project at Makushin Volcano.

At a City Council meeting on Tuesday, Corporation CEO Chris Salts said the company's goal is to reduce the city's consumption of 200,000 gallons of fuel each month, as well as lower and stabilize utility costs for residents and businesses.

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