NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD

Megan Thomson-Dean

It was a blustery fall day at Tom Madsen Airport. A PenAir flight from Anchorage was making its second attempt to land in Unalaska. Gusting tail-winds made the landing extra challenging. As the plane touched down it failed to slow down, broke through the airport's chain link fence, crossed a road and hit a rocky embankment just short of the frigid waters of Iliuliuk Bay.

Steve Ranney was among the 39 passengers on Flight 3296.  He's a commercial pilot with 20 years experience and still trying to understand what went wrong that day.

Courtesy of Cole Corbett

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released its preliminary report on a medevac airplane that crashed into the waters of Unalaska Bay last month.

While the early findings establish some of the facts surrounding the Jan. 16 crash, the chief of the NTSB's Alaska Regional Office said it's too soon to pinpoint the cause.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Since RavnAir Group's PenAir plane crash in October, Unalaskans haven't been able to use Alaska Airlines miles to book flights to or from Anchorage.

Now, City Manager Erin Reinders has hope the airlines are nearing a deal that'll let travelers use their stockpiled miles rather than shell out cash or forgo trips.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

After weeks of uncertainty in the wake of last month's fatal plane crash, RavnAir Group has released flight schedules between Unalaska and Anchorage through May 31, 2020.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

The PenAir flight that crashed at Unalaska's airport last month, killing one passenger, landed amid unfavorable, shifting winds, according to an initial federal report released Friday.

It was also captained by a pilot with relatively little experience at the controls of the Saab 2000 plane he was flying, the report said.

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