KASHEGA

KUCB Staff

Over the last 10 years, the Lost Villages Project has helped Unangax̂ people to reconnect with the communities of Makushin, Kashega, Biorka, and Attu — none of which were resettled after the evacuation and Aleutian campaign of World War II.

Now, the project is being commemorated with a film premiere, a museum exhibit, and a reunion trip.

MUSEUM OF THE ALEUTIANS

The Museum of the Aleutians is opening a new exhibit June 14.

"Chiilulix: The Long Journey Home" will explore the history of four Aleutian communities that were never resettled after the evacuation of World War II — as well as the Lost Villages Project that eventually helped Unangax̂ survivors and descendants to reconnect with those places. 

Zoe Sobel/KUCB

After a decade of collecting footage and interviews, KUCB will premiere its new documentary on June 13.

The film is called "Tanadgusim Adan Chiilulix: Revisiting the Lost Villages of the Aleutian Islands." It's about a project that brought Unangax̂ survivors of World War II back to the communities they were forced to leave during the war — and then never allowed to resettle.

KUCB's Laura Kraegel sat down with fellow reporter Zoë Sobel to learn more about the documentary inspired by the Lost Villages Project.

TRANSCRIPT

Courtesy of Julia Dushkin

The last person born in the traditional village of Kashega has died.

Eva Tcheripanoff grew up in the small Unangax̂ community on Unalaska Island and spent the 1930s hunting foxes, eating dry fish, and playing with homemade stone dolls.

That all changed during World War II, when Kashega was evacuated and never resettled. But as KUCB's Laura Kraegel reports, Tcheripanoff came through the upheaval and lived a long life of 90 years.

TRANSCRIPT -- -- --

TCHERIPANOFF (Unangam Tunuu and English): "I was born in Kashega and I used to play around."