Industry

Stories from the KUCB Newsroom on the topic of business and industry. Also includes volunteer Frank Kelty's weekly fisheries update, the Unalaska Fisheries Report.

Maggie Nelson/KUCB

Today marks the opener for the 2020 red king crab fishing season. The beginning of the king crab season is always a busy time in Unalaska/Dutch Harbor, with the arrival of numerous fishermen from all over the country, as well as film and production crews with the widely known Discovery Channel television series Deadliest Catch. 

Despite the influx of fishermen and television crews, this season was a little quieter than usual due to the coronavirus pandemic and local mitigation protocol that required most fishermen to quarantine for two weeks.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

 

 

A 7.8-magnitude earthquake hit south of Chignik last week, prompting tsunami warnings in communities across coastal Alaska. 

KUCB Staff

 

A number of recent unplanned power outages in Unalaska were caused by an electronic governor — located on one of the city's diesel engines — that needs retuning, according to city officials.

Public Utilities Director Dan Winters said at a City Council meeting Tuesday night that what's supposed to happen is that when the engine is shutting down it comes down automatically, at about 1000 kilowatts and then it will open the breaker. But it's currently shutting down at more than twice that amount — at about 2500 kilowatts — and kicking the breaker.

Courtesy of American Seafoods

86 crew members of an American Seafoods trawler have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a press release from the seafood company Sunday night. Nine tests are still outstanding.

The American Dynasty — a 272-foot trawler whose home port is Seattle, WA — had previously reported one crew member tested positive and was admitted to the hospital on Friday, May 29, for treatment. As a result, the company decided to test the entire crew, and on May 30 an additional 85 crew members were confirmed positive. 

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, Unalaska's onshore processing plants have chosen to keep seasonal employees on-island in between fishing seasons.

In a rural Alaskan town of 4500 year-round residents, an influx of approximately one thousand international workers—looking for ways to keep busy—is quite a change.

UniSea is keeping plant security tight. In order to enter, everyone must pass through a checkpoint and show a company ID or be placed on a list of expected visitors. 

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