Industry

Stories from the KUCB Newsroom on the topic of business and industry. Also includes volunteer Frank Kelty's weekly fisheries update, the Unalaska Fisheries Report.

Unalaska Fisheries Report, 11/13/15

Nov 13, 2015

Homer gets displaced by Kodiak for Halibut landings in 2015, and other surprises, on this week's episode of the Unalaska Fisheries Report with Frank Kelty.

Unalaska Fisheries Report, 10/30/2015

Nov 2, 2015
Lauren Adams / KUCB

This week the Unalaska Fisheries Report discussed Bering Sea Aleutian Islands crab fisheries.  Frank interviewed Miranda Westphal, a biologist from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Bering Sea Snow Crab Catch Limit Down 40 Percent

Oct 29, 2015
KUCB File Photo

Last week the Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced catch limits for the state’s crab fisheries. On Monday, a Fish and Game biologist explained how the agency determined those catch limits to a group of crabbers in Seattle. Nine local crabbers gathered at Unalaska’s City Hall to tune into the conference call and ask questions.

The biggest drop in total allowable catch – or the TAC – is for Bering Sea snow crab, also known as opilio. The total allowable catch this season for snow crab is just over 40 million pounds. That’s a forty percent drop from last season.

Fishing Boat Leaks Ammonia Cloud at Unalaska Dock

Oct 29, 2015
Zac Schasteen / Unalaska Department of Public Safety

Emergency crews were mopping up an ammonia leak from a boat at the OSI dock on Unalaska's Captains Bay Road midday Friday. They blocked off the road at the Crowley dock Friday morning, about a half mile closer to town, as they responded to the leak. At 11 a.m., Unalaska police officers moved the road block closer to OSI, stopping traffic just before the main entrance to the facility. 

As of 12:30 p.m., OSI employees were still sheltering in place. Coast Guard and Unalaska Public Safety personnel were on the scene.

Officials said there was no imminent public health threat.

Sun Sets on Shell Oil's Arctic Quest

Oct 14, 2015
John Ryan / KUCB

Shell Oil's Polar Pioneer rig left Alaska's Dutch Harbor for Port Angeles, Washington, on Wednesday.

The energy giant's other Arctic rig, the Noble Discoverer, left Dutch Harbor for Everett, Washington, on Monday.

Other ships in Shell's Arctic fleet are expected to leave Alaska over the next couple of weeks, and the company has not disclosed the fate of the 400 employees who have worked on the project in Anchorage.

But the departure of the 30-story-tall Polar Pioneer is the most visible sign that Shell's 8-year hunt for oil in the Arctic Ocean has come to an end.

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