home-based education

Courtesy of Nayeli Ramirez

It's been nearly a year since Gov. Dunleavy closed public schools to help mitigate the spread of the coronavirus pandemic last spring. 

Since then, the Unalaska City School District has been bouncing back and forth between three different types of learning: home-based, in-person, and a combination of the two. And that 11-month juggling act has taken a toll on many of the island's teachers, parents, and students.

 

Hope McKenney/KUCB

Unalaska's largest fish processing plant reopened Monday after a COVID-19 outbreak forced it to shut down for almost a month. 

UniSea closed its doors Jan. 5 after a handful of workers tested positive for the virus, following a New Year's gathering in company housing. 

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

 

Since the beginning of December, Unalaska students have been in their classrooms for a total of just three days. They've spent the rest of that time learning from their homes.

Remote education has been a challenge for many teachers and families, especially recently, as the district shifted to in-person learning and back out again, all within about one week. 

Berett Wilber/KUCB

 

As the city contends with potential widespread exposure to the coronavirus, Unalaska's schools have begun to determine if and how they will provide in-person learning opportunities to students.

Courtesy of Tacho

 

As Unalaskans are once again being asked to stay at home as much as possible after the city raised its coronavirus risk level to "high" on Thursday, students are left in limbo — awaiting transition to distance education.

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