GCI

Berett Wilber/KUCB

After missing another of its own deadlines, GCI has set a new launch date for Unalaska’s 4G LTE service.

Vice President Dan Boyette said the telecommunications company is now aiming for Feb. 28.

He plans to confirm the launch on Feb. 26. 

“I’m pretty confident we’ll be able to hit these new dates,” said Boyette in an email to KUCB. “But I know I’ve said that to you before, so I’d understand if you are skeptical.”

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

While the final decision is still months away, GCI has taken another small step toward bringing high-speed internet to Unalaska.

The telecommunications company applied for the project’s first permit this month.

If granted, the license from the Federal Communications Commission will allow GCI to extend its fiber optic network to the Aleutian chain.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

A GCI Outage last week left Unalaskans unable to call the Department of Public Safety.

DPS sent out a text alert on October 6 warning community members that they should try using landline phones if they were unable to connect with a cell phone.

GCI detected a potential issue on Oct. 5 and enlisted on the ground technicians to investigate. GCI vice president Dan Boyette says any outage is unacceptable.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

GCI’s vice president came to Tuesday night’s city council meeting to drum up support for their potential plan to bring fiber to Unalaska.

“I’m not here to talk about satellite today," said GCI's Dan Boyette. "I’m here to talk about satellite replacement today.”

Boyette said the company wants to bring faster service to Unalaska and a subsea fiber-optic cable may be the solution.

GCI is currently in the process of doing a marine survey. Boyette says they have already put in $2 million, but the entire project would end up costing $40 million.

GCI is looking into what it would take to bring faster internet to Unalaska. The telecommunications company is evaluating if fiber would be a financially feasible solution. Right now, they are in the exploratory process.

Spokesperson Heather Handyside said the company is surveying a route between a fiber facility in Levelock and Unalaska.

“If we are to do a build-out of a fiber cable, it will help us understand how to best engineer that cable so that it can withstand all the elements or obstacles that it might encounter,” Handyside said.

Pages