fishing

Maggie Nelson/KUCB

The Unalaska City School District opened its doors to students once again last month. And along with new mask-wearing, social distancing, and hand-washing measures, the district has welcomed six new teachers.

Maggie Nelson/KUCB

The Unalaska City School District opened its doors to students once again last month. And along with new mask-wearing, social distancing, and hand-washing measures, the district has welcomed six new teachers.

When I spoke with Bill Carroll, Unalaska's new junior high and high school resource teacher, the word "fishing" was the most frequently used word in our conversation, surfacing a total of 24 times.

 

Sharon Svarny-Livingston

Since mid-March, Unalaskans have been hunkering down and socially isolating due to the COVID-19 pandemic. During that time—and even now as the State of Alaska reopens—many people have been avoiding crowds and public spaces such as bars, restaurants, and supermarkets, and spending more time in their own kitchens.

Over the past couple months, I spoke with a few locals to see what kind of experiments, recipes, and memories they’ve been cooking up during the pandemic.

 

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, Unalaska's onshore processing plants have chosen to keep seasonal employees on-island in between fishing seasons.

In a rural Alaskan town of 4500 year-round residents, an influx of approximately one thousand international workers—looking for ways to keep busy—is quite a change.

UniSea is keeping plant security tight. In order to enter, everyone must pass through a checkpoint and show a company ID or be placed on a list of expected visitors. 

Hope McKenney/KUCB

Alaska health officials have allowed fishing companies' workers to wait out a two-week post-travel quarantine in close quarters on their fishing boats, even after authorities denied a similar proposal by a North Slope oil company. 

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