fisheries

Graphic courtesy NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center

 

There’s a new tool to help scientists and others interested in monitoring how Bering Sea fisheries respond to a changing climate.

Biologist Steve Barbeaux of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center has created hundreds of graphics mapping where 22 species of fish spend their time during different life stages.

The data comes from annual trawl surveys dating back to 1984, but Barbeaux says that information was hard to analyze as a whole.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Over the weekend, 60 Unalaskans hit the streets — and the beach— to participate in the People's Climate March.

Local demonstrators joined hundreds of thousands of people nationwide in protesting the Trump administration's policies on the environment and raising awareness about climate change.

"Boom! Like thunder! Climate change will take you under!" High school students led the charge at Unalaska's march, chanting at the front of the group. "Flash! Like lightning! Climate change is so darn frightening!"

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia Commons

The Alaska Board of Fisheries has scheduled a special meeting in May to consider changing the harvest strategy for Bering Sea tanner crab.

The current strategy sparked controversy last year, when biologists were forced to cancel the $50 million commercial fishery after the bairdi population fell short of the opening threshold.

Alaska State Troopers

The Alaska Wildlife Troopers cited three fishermen late last month for violating commercial fishing rules in the Aleutian Islands.

In Adak, troopers fined Tran Lucky of Puyallup, WA $260 for working aboard the F/V Alaska Victory without a valid license.

The vessel’s captain -- David Bishop of Milton, WA -- received the same fine for employing an unlicensed crew member.

Meanwhile, Dean Pedersen of Wasilla was cited for configuring his cod pots illegally near Sand Point.

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

 

The fishing industry in Unalaska is dominated by men. But behind the scenes, at the local branch of a public health and safety company, there’s a woman running the show.

Nicole Beier works for NSF International, a company responsible for quality testing fish at America’s top fishing port. And now she’s tasked with expanding their capacity.

Beier always knew she wanted to work in science, but never imagined she’d end up in Unalaska.

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