FAA

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

 

Saturday marked the one year anniversary of Unalaska's fatal PenAir plane crash. On October 17 of last year, the Saab 2000 plane went off the end of Tom Madsen Airport's runway. 42 people were on board, over 11 were injured, and one passenger died.

Ravn Alaska

 

The company that bought Ravn's core assets initially hoped to relaunch operations around this time, but the new owners now say that they hope to resume flying in another month, in mid-September.

Rob McKinney is the new chief executive of the rebranded company, Ravn Alaska, and he says some unforeseen challenges delayed the relaunch of service to the Aleutian Islands, Bristol Bay, and Kenai Peninsula.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

While Unalaska was granted $1,120,265 from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act — or CARES Act — for its airport last week, many questions remain about what the funding can be used for. 

The funding comes from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to offset impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

 

Unalaska has been granted $1,120,265 from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act — or CARES Act — for its airport.

 

The funding comes from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which released $124.17 million for Alaskan airports to offset impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic last week. 

 

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

The City of Unalaska may consider legal action against the airlines involved in last month's fatal plane crash.

City Councilor Shari Coleman proposed the idea at a meeting on Tuesday. She said the community is suffering from financial "collateral damage," as regular flights to and from Anchorage have been shut down for nearly four weeks.

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