environment

Courtesy of Washington Sea Grant

 

Native species are well adapted to living in the challenging environment of the Bering Sea, but increased shipping means there are more opportunities for invasive species to hitch a ride in. And as the waters warm, the ecosystem will become more hospitable making it easier for them to settle.

Zoologist Jesika Reimer is part of a team studying the threat.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

 

The city of King Cove says it has reached a deal with the Trump administration to build a road through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. King Cove residents argue they need the road to access the all-weather airport in Cold Bay. But environmental groups believe it will ruin critical wildlife habitat.

Now, city administrator Gary Hennigh says they have reached an agreement with the Interior Department for a land swap — between the King Cove Corporation and the federal government. He expects the deal to be signed January 22nd in Washington D.C.

ZOË SOBEL/KUCB

 

After months sitting abandoned in Unalaska, the state announced on Dec. 22 its intention to dispose of the F/V Akutan.

 

The processor was abandoned in Unalaska’s Captains Bay in September following a disastrous fishing season in Bristol Bay where the ship’s owner went broke, the crew went unpaid, and it’s 158,000 pound haul of salmon was declared unfit for human consumption.

 

ZOË SOBEL/KUCB

   

After months sitting abandoned in Unalaska, the state announced Friday its intention to dispose of the fishing vessel Akutan.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

A small eastern Aleutian community is now getting nearly all of its electricity from renewable sources. With a second hydro facility that began producing power late this spring, the city of King Cove has dramatically reduced its dependence on diesel.

Gary Hennigh has been focused on renewable energy ever since his first city council meeting as King Cove City Administrator in 1989.

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