environment

Jessica Tran/Aleut Community of St. Paul Island Ecosystem Conservation Office

St. Paul Island's rogue rat has met its demise after 10 months of evading capture and living large at the local fish plant.

The rat was found dead last weekend by a visiting birder. The discovery has sent tempered relief throughout the community, which has worked for decades to remain rodent-free.

St. Paul is a haven for millions of nesting seabirds. It's also one of the few island communities in the world that has been able to protect its rich wildlife from invasive rodents.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

After spending years on Standard Oil Hill, the Qawalangin Tribe has leased a new home in the valley.

The tribe moved into the former Unalaska Building Supply this spring. KUCB's Laura Kraegel stopped by for a tour.

"On the east side, outside of the building, you'll see the big sign that says 'Recycle Center,'" says Shayla Shaishnikoff of the tribe's environmental department.

Shaishnikoff is pointing out the new 24-hour drop-off for its recycling program.

Berett Wilber / KUCB

The City of Unalaska plans to pitch in to continue monitoring local salmon habitat by drone.

This will be the second year of a survey project that has local business owner Andy Dietrick, of Aleutian Aerial LLC, capturing high-resolution footage of salmon. That footage is then sent to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game for analysis.

At a City Council meeting on May 14, Councilor Dave Gregory argued the city should support the project.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

As of Tuesday, single-use plastic bags will no longer be allowed in Unalaska.

The City Council unanimously passed the ban in August – after six months of discussions and overwhelming public support.

Andy Dietrick / NMFS (NOAA MMHSRP Permit # 18786-03)

Unalaskans helped to free a humpback whale last weekend after it was caught in fishing lines and buoys in Unalaska Bay.

A responder with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) led the disentanglement team, which included local port officials, NOAA officers, and residents like Andy Dietrick and Dan and Sue Magone.

KUCB's Laura Kraegel spoke with John Moran about his team's 12-hour response that spanned two days.

If you see a marine mammal in distress, report the sighting to the Marine Mammal Stranding Network at 1-877-925-7773.

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