covid-19

Sarah Spelsberg

Unalaska is the largest community in the state without a critical access hospital, with a population of 4,500 year-round residents that more than doubles during peak fishing seasons.

Early on in the COVID-19 pandemic, medical workers and politicians were unsure how bad the pandemic would get. And concern over the availability of ventilators — machines that help a patient breathe or breathe for them — intensified.

City of Cold Bay

Officials reported two positive cases of COVID-19 in the Alaska Peninsula village of Cold Bay over the weekend. This marks 11 confirmed cases in the community of roughly 50 people.

Upon receiving the positive test results, the unnamed individuals were placed in isolation, according to Eastern Aleutian Tribes, the regional tribal healthcare provider, which operates Cold Bay's Anna Livingston Memorial Clinic.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

UniSea has seen five positive cases of the coronavirus among its employees and employee family members since late August.

That's largely due to an influx of about 100 new processing workers that the island's biggest seafood processor brought in to fill a gap in the market, according to UniSea President and CEO Tom Enlow. 

Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska

More than six million Americans enrolled in food stamps in the first three months of the coronavirus pandemic, as people across the country lost their jobs and children transitioned to at-home learning.

The 17 percent expansion from February to May in the food stamps program — formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP — is the fastest growth in the program's history, according to the New York Times.

City of Cold Bay

Officials reported six positive cases of COVID-19 in the Alaska Peninsula village of Cold Bay on Wednesday. This marks nine confirmed cases in the community of roughly 50 people, after two non-residents tested positive for the virus in June, and one resident tested positive in early August.

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