CLEVELAND VOLCANO

courtesy of Burke Mees / Alaska Volcano Observatory

 

Scientists have downgraded the alert level at one of Alaska's most active volcanoes after a sustained pause in volcanic unrest. 

This comes after the Alaska Volcano Observatory  raised Cleveland Volcano's alert level to "advisory" early in the summer, after a short-lived explosion on the evening of June 1.

Alaska Volcano Observatory

 

An explosion at one of Alaska's most active volcanoes has led scientists to raise its alert level to "watch." This comes after the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) lowered Cleveland Volcano's alert level in early May after nearly a year and a half of inactivity.

Cleveland is located on an uninhabited island in the central Aleutians, west of Umnak Island. Around 10:30 p.m. on Monday, the AVO detected a small explosion that sent an ash plume 22,000 feet, traveling to the south.

Candace Shaack

After showing signs of restlessness, Pavlof Volcano is back at a normal alert level.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory issued an "advisory" for Pavlof last month, following small explosions at its summit 36 miles northeast of Cold Bay. Since then, there have been no further signs of unrest, and scientists downgraded the volcano to "normal" last week.

U.S. Geological Survey vis Wikimedia Commons

Cleveland Volcano has produced a new batch of lava, prompting scientists to raise the volcano’s alert level to an intermediate “watch.”

Over the last few weeks, satellite images have shown the lava grow from a small mound deep in Cleveland’s crater to a wide dome spanning nearly 150 feet.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory hasn’t detected any seismic activity near the volcano, which sits about 50 miles west of Nikolski in the Islands of the Four Mountains. But scientists have observed elevated surface temperatures.

Janet Schaefer/ADGGS/AVO

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has lowered the alert levels for two Aleutian volcanoes.

Bogoslof is back at the intermediate "watch" level, following a powerful eruption Tuesday night.

The volcano hasn’t produced ash since that three-hour blast and its seismicity has died off, but scientists say Bogoslof could blow again with little warning.

Meanwhile, Cleveland Volcano -- 45 miles west of Nikolski -- has been quiet since a small eruption last month.

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