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CLEVELAND

U.S. Geological Survey vis Wikimedia Commons

Cleveland Volcano has produced a new batch of lava, prompting scientists to raise the volcano’s alert level to an intermediate “watch.”

Over the last few weeks, satellite images have shown the lava grow from a small mound deep in Cleveland’s crater to a wide dome spanning nearly 150 feet.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory hasn’t detected any seismic activity near the volcano, which sits about 50 miles west of Nikolski in the Islands of the Four Mountains. But scientists have observed elevated surface temperatures.

Dave Schneider/USGS/AVO

Bogoslof Volcano is back at a low-level “advisory” for the first time since it began erupting more than three months ago.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) downgraded Bogoslof’s alert level Wednesday, bringing it just one notch above “normal.”

AVO Geophysicist Dave Schneider said it has been weeks since the Aleutian volcano showed any sign of life.

Janet Schaefer/ADGGS/AVO

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has lowered the alert levels for two Aleutian volcanoes.

Bogoslof is back at the intermediate "watch" level, following a powerful eruption Tuesday night.

The volcano hasn’t produced ash since that three-hour blast and its seismicity has died off, but scientists say Bogoslof could blow again with little warning.

Meanwhile, Cleveland Volcano -- 45 miles west of Nikolski -- has been quiet since a small eruption last month.

AVO / U.S. Geological Survey

Scientists have returned Takawangha Volcano’s alert level to “normal,” saying nearby seismic activity has steadily dissipated over the last two weeks.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) detected an "energetic" swarm of earthquakes near the volcano late last month.

Sixty miles west of Adak, Takawangha has no known eruptions in the historical record. But the activity prompted the AVO to raise its alert level to “advisory,” indicating elevated unrest.