Bering Sea

NOAA FishWatch

In a new study, scientists have linked warming Arctic temperatures, changing wind patterns, and shifting currents to movement of commercially valuable Alaska pollock in the Bering Sea.

The Bering Sea has seen the loss of a summer cold water barrier in recent years, which used to keep pollock from spreading out and moving north.

But while scientists are seeing drastic shifts in pollock movement patterns, further research needs to be conducted to know what the changes mean for communities like Unalaska/Dutch Harbor and the billion-dollar pollock industry.

Courtesy of Mariza Tovar

 

People have been practicing tarot for centuries, looking to the cards for guidance and reflection. 

And today, you can find any number of themed tarot decks, from cat tarot, to Star Trek tarot, to tiny tarot and tarot for kids. 

But local Mariza Tovar is putting together a tarot deck filled with humpback whales, grizzly bears, red-faced cormorants, and sea kelp—a deck uniquely Alaskan.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

A storm early Sunday morning in Unalaska recorded high gusts of 120 mph.

The strong winds toppled boats, threw shipping containers into the bay, and even blew the windows out of American President Lines' crane. 

The rapidly developing storm, which moved from the North Pacific and across the Eastern Aleutians, was an intense storm for this time of year, according to climatologist Rick Thoman. 

 

Courtesy Brent Paine

 

Bering Sea pollock fishermen had a close encounter Wednesday with Russian military vessels conducting pre-planned exercises, according to industry officials and a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman.

"They are telling American fishing vessels to move out of the way," said Brent Paine, executive director of United Catcher Boats, an industry trade group. "They've got some submarines and destroyers and nobody knows anything about it."

Hope McKenney/KUCB

 

The results of outstanding COVID-19 tests on an American Seafoods trawler have come back, according to the company.

Earlier this week, 86 crew members on the American Dynasty – a 272-foot factory trawler based out of Seattle – tested positive for the virus, but nine tests were still outstanding.

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