Bering Sea

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Commercial fishing opens Tuesday, Oct. 15 for Bristol Bay red king crab.

This season, the declining population has forced managers to set the total allowable catch (TAC) at 3.8 million pounds.

That number is 12 percent lower than last year, as well as the lowest since the fishery was rationalized in 2005. Even if fishermen catch all of the TAC, it'll be the smallest harvest since 1982.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

A small group of Unalaskans learned to identify bird carcasses last week in an effort to help scientists track increasing mortalities on Alaska's beaches.

The training was held by the University of Washington's Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST), one of the organizations that monitored the state's fifth straight summer of mass die-offs.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

With the fishing season starting next week, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game has released crab quotas for Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea.

The total allowable catch for red king crab is 3.8 million pounds. That's about 12 percent less than last season, as well as the lowest since the fishery's rationalization in 2005.

Zoë Sobel / KUCB

 

Unalaska welcomed two Japanese-flagged vessels to port this week — one devoted to Arctic research, the other connected to controversial commercial whaling.

The first is the Oshoro Maru V, a research vessel for Hokkaido University's school of fisheries sciences.

 

Professor Toru Hirawake is the chief scientist onboard.

 

Kristin Cieciel/NOAA

 

Do jellyfish affect Bering Sea fisheries? And if so, how?

That’s what Yale University’s Jonathan Rutter wants to find out. The college senior is conducting a survey to learn more about the gelatinous creatures directly from fishermen.

 

“What are these impacts that jellyfish have on Bering Sea fisheries?" Rutter said. "And those impacts could be economic- or nuisance-based. I’m going in it with a pretty open mind.”

 

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