AVO

U.S. Geological Survey vis Wikimedia Commons

Cleveland Volcano has produced a new batch of lava, prompting scientists to raise the volcano’s alert level to an intermediate “watch.”

Over the last few weeks, satellite images have shown the lava grow from a small mound deep in Cleveland’s crater to a wide dome spanning nearly 150 feet.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory hasn’t detected any seismic activity near the volcano, which sits about 50 miles west of Nikolski in the Islands of the Four Mountains. But scientists have observed elevated surface temperatures.

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Several small earthquakes shook the area around Bogoslof Volcano on Saturday, prompting scientists to raise its alert level to an intermediate “watch.”

Bogoslof hasn’t erupted in over a month, but officials with the Alaska Volcano Observatory say seismic activity over the weekend has increased the likelihood of another explosion.

Before going quiet last month, the eastern Aleutian volcano had erupted 37 times since mid-December.

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Bogoslof Volcano blew again Monday morning, marking its thirty-seventh explosion since the volcano roared back to life three months ago.

The short blast began around 3:30 a.m. and lasted just 12 minutes.

While the eruption produced an ash cloud, the Alaska Volcano Observatory has not predicted ash fall for Unalaska.

Scientists say this explosion appears to be over, and the AVO has left Bogoslof’s alert level at an intermediate “watch.” 

Janet Schaefer/ADGGS/AVO

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has lowered the alert levels for two Aleutian volcanoes.

Bogoslof is back at the intermediate "watch" level, following a powerful eruption Tuesday night.

The volcano hasn’t produced ash since that three-hour blast and its seismicity has died off, but scientists say Bogoslof could blow again with little warning.

Meanwhile, Cleveland Volcano -- 45 miles west of Nikolski -- has been quiet since a small eruption last month.

Dave Schneider/USGS/AVO

Bogoslof Volcano exploded Tuesday night in its most powerful eruption since activity began three months ago.

Given the intensity of the three-hour blast, scientists expected Unalaskans to wake up and find the island dusted with ash.

Kristi Wallace of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) said she was puzzled when that didn’t happen.

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