AVO

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Bogoslof Volcano has exploded more than two dozen times since December, but not all eruptions are created equal.

On Friday, for instance, the Aleutian volcano spit ash about 20,000 feet into the air during a brief half-hour blast that dusted Bogoslof Island and not much else. It was a far cry from last Monday’s eruption.

That event lasted eight hours, spewing ash 35,000 feet high and coating Unalaska -- more than 50 miles away -- with a fine layer. 

AVO / U.S. Geological Survey

One Aleutian volcano has erupted again, and another is showing signs of life.

Bogoslof Volcano erupted early Tuesday morning, continuing a series of explosions that date back to mid-December.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) warned a trace amount of ash could fall on Unalaska, 60 miles to the east, but there have been no reports of it reaching the island.

Meanwhile, the AVO has increased the alert level for Takawangha Volcano, 60 miles west of Adak.

Vic Fisher

Bogoslof Volcano erupted again Wednesday, spewing a cloud of ash that was visible from Unalaska.

The volcano blew around 1:20 p.m., sending ash at least 31,000 feet into the air and prompting the Alaska Volcano Observatory to raise its alert level to red.

That’s the highest status, indicating a hazardous eruption is underway or imminent.

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