alaska volcano observatory

Courtesy Malcolm Herstand / Alaska Volcano Observatory

 

Over the past two weeks, there has been increased earthquake activity near Makushin Volcano. The activity started on June 15 with a magnitude 4.2 earthquake, followed by several additional significant earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.1 to 4.1 over the next 24 hours.

These larger earthquakes have been accompanied by over 850 smaller ones located by the Alaska Volcano Observatory since mid-June. 

Berett Wilber/KUCB

More than half of the City of Unalaska's tsunami sirens aren't functioning, according to city officials.

The city tested its tsunami sirens, which were purchased in 1996, on Wednesday. Three out of seven worked. 

Following a number of earthquakes near Makushin Volcano earlier in the week — which prompted the Alaska Volcano Observatory to increase the volcano's alert level to "advisory" — local concern about Unalaska's emergency preparedness has been elevated.

Courtesy Malcolm Herstand / Alaska Volcano Observatory

KUCB's Vic Fisher interviewed Dr. John Power about recent earthquake activity in the vicinity of Makushin Volcano and the relationship to possible volcanic activity.  Dr. John Power is an expert in geophysical seismology and works for the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

During the interview, Dr. Power mentioned several online informational resources:

Alaska Earthquake Center

 

Updated 06/15/2020 at 7 p.m.

A magnitude-4.2 earthquake occurred under Makushin Volcano Monday afternoon and was felt in Unalaska.

At around 2:16 p.m., an earthquake at a depth of about five miles hit approximately six miles southeast of the volcano's summit, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Small aftershocks are continuing, as is typical for an earthquake of this size.

Alaska Volcano Observatory

 

An explosion at one of Alaska's most active volcanoes has led scientists to raise its alert level to "watch." This comes after the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) lowered Cleveland Volcano's alert level in early May after nearly a year and a half of inactivity.

Cleveland is located on an uninhabited island in the central Aleutians, west of Umnak Island. Around 10:30 p.m. on Monday, the AVO detected a small explosion that sent an ash plume 22,000 feet, traveling to the south.

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