ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME

Maggie Nelson/KUCB

 

On Thursday evening, around 9 p.m. a bald eagle made its way into the Alaska Ship Supply grocery store in Unalaska. 

From outside, the store appeared closed and quiet — the lights were off and the parking lot was virtually empty, except for two local cop cars. On the inside, however, store employees, local law enforcement and a volunteer were pursuing the unwelcome guest, waving long PVC pipes and tossing blankets and pieces of cardboard, in an attempt to maneuver the bird out of the large building. 

 

Feds Approve $50M Pandemic Relief For Alaska's Fishing Sector

Mar 1, 2021
Joe Viechnicki/KFSK

 

Alaska's plan to pay out nearly $50 million to the fishing industry for pandemic relief has been approved by the federal government. 

That's after two major revisions and more than 200 public comments from every industry sector.

Courtesy of ADF&G

If you have a P.O. box in Unalaska or Dutch Harbor, it's likely you've received a bright orange postcard in the past few days. That card is a notification for an upcoming subsistence harvest survey through the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

The survey is part of a larger project, according to Jackie Keating, a researcher with ADF&G's subsistence division. And the goal of that project is to document local knowledge and concerns about subsistence harvesting.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game Bi-Weekly Fishing Report Unalaska Bay/Dutch Harbor Road System

Regulation reminders:

· The bag limit for Unalaska Bay fresh and saltwaters is 5 salmon per day of which only 2 may be sockeye or 2 may be coho.

· Anglers are reminded that Town Creek (Iliuliuk) and Summer Bay Creek are closed to fish for sockeye year-round.

· The saltwaters of Summer Bay 250 yards around the mouth of the creek and Summer Bay Lake are closed as of August 16.

Hope McKenney/KUCB

Two dead whales have washed up on Unalaska's shores in the past week: an adult fin whale — which is the second largest mammal in the world — and a juvenile humpback. 

 

And while local biologists hoped to determine the cause of deaths of both whales, because of COVID-19, they likely won't be able to. 

 

Pages