ADFG

Berett Wilber / KUCB

The City of Unalaska plans to pitch in to continue monitoring local salmon habitat by drone.

This will be the second year of a survey project that has local business owner Andy Dietrick, of Aleutian Aerial LLC, capturing high-resolution footage of salmon. That footage is then sent to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game for analysis.

At a City Council meeting on May 14, Councilor Dave Gregory argued the city should support the project.

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

After a partial opening this year, the Eastern Aleutian District tanner crab fishery is closed for 2019. The district has three sections: Akutan, Makushin/Skan Bay, and Unalaska/Kalekta Bay.

Based on information from a recent trawl survey, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game decided to close all three sections.

While assistant area management biologist Ethan Nichols says the Akutan section was well below the stock level necessary to open the fishery, the other two sections were close.

Red King Crab Quota Down 35 Percent

Oct 15, 2018
Alaska Department of Fish and Game

While crab fishing is underway in the Bering Sea, the quota for red king crab is down significantly.

At 4.3 million pounds, the total allowable catch is 35 percent lower than last season's TAC, which was already the lowest since 1996.

Biologists expected the annual trawl survey to show a decline in the red crab population, but the drop was even greater than anticipated.

KUCB

Unalaska's first drone-operated salmon survey is now underway.

The Unalaska Native Fishermen's Association (UNFA) has hired Andy Dietrick — of Aleutian Aerial LLC — to capture video of salmon habitat at Unalaska Lake, Summer Bay Lake, and Morris Cove.

The goal is to estimate the size of the island's largely unmonitored fish populations. To collect that data, Dietrick is filming in a 35-millimeter format that approaches "cinema quality." 

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Golden king crab season opens Wednesday in the Aleutian Islands.

And for the first time in its 22-year history, the commercial fishery isn't capped by a rigid quota.

"It's really exciting this year," said biologist Miranda Westphal of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. "It was great to have some freedom in setting limits in this fishery."

Brown crab prefer the deep, current-heavy waters of island passes, so it's basically impossible to count them. In fact, Westphal said this is the region's only large rationalized crab fishery without a survey.

Pages