port of dutch harbor

Berett Wilber/KUCB

After more than 20 years of playing with the idea, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is closing in on its final recommendations for a dredging project in Iliuliuk Bay.

Removing a large sandbar could open the Port of Dutch Harbor to deeper-draft vessels — and bigger business. But it might also affect wildlife, currents, and erosion along Front Beach.

This week, the Corps is visiting Unalaska to present the first draft of its feasibility study. KUCB's Laura Kraegel spoke with Ports Director Peggy McLaughlin to learn more about the project.

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NOAA Fishwatch

Bering Sea fishermen are now trawling for one of Alaska’s most profitable catches.

Pollock "B" season opened Sunday with a total quota of 731,804 metric tons.

That's about one percent higher than last year, according to Krista Milani, a groundfish manager for the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants public feedback on a proposed dredging project in Unalaska/Dutch Harbor.

The Corps is planning to dredge a bar at the entrance to Iliuliuk Bay, which will make Dutch Harbor more accessible to deeper draft vessels. Currently, the bar limits access to the port.

An online report on the project includes information on potential environmental impacts.

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

Unalaska is America’s fish capital. More seafood is hauled into Dutch Harbor than anywhere in the country, but for residents it’s not easy to find fresh fish unless they catch it themselves.

NOAA FishWatch

Saturday at noon is the start of A-season for Pollock. Krista Milani of the National Marine Fisheries Services says the total allowable catch (TAC) this year is about 1 percent bigger than last year.

“Last year [the TAC] was 1.345 million metric tons and this year its going to be 1.364 million metric tons," Milandi said. "It is a slight increase from last year.”

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