Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Mexican authorities say they found a clandestine grave with the remains of at least 166 people in the state of Veracruz — the latest mass grave in a place that has been marred by disappearances, warring drug cartels and government-sponsored violence.

Veracruz Attorney General Jorge Winckler said at a Thursday news conference that the site was discovered after a witness tipped off authorities about a month ago.

Updated at 11:30 a.m.

Anti-government protesters in Iraq set fire to the Iranian consulate in the southern city of Basra on Friday, as the week's demonstrations turned violent.

Updated Friday at 9:55 a.m. ET

Police seized 20 pit bulls and about 1,500 hens and roosters, many of which were destined for fighting, from a home in western Wisconsin.

The dogs and birds were "living in deplorable conditions," according to a joint statement issued Thursday by the Pierce County Sheriff's Office and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

A military court in South Sudan sentenced 10 soldiers to prison on Thursday for raping foreign aid workers and killing a journalist in an attack on a hotel in 2016.

The incident took place in the capital city of Juba, as the young country's civil war raged on. Government troops stormed through layer after layer of gates at the Terrain Hotel. Over several hours, the soldiers executed journalist John Gatluak Nhial near a stand of trees and gang-raped humanitarian workers, including an American, an Italian and a Dutch national.

The son of a Boston police captain was sentenced Wednesday to 20 years in prison for an ISIS-inspired terrorist plot — three years after his father tipped off federal law enforcement.

Alexander Ciccolo, 26, went by the name Ali Al Amriki. His father, Robert Ciccolo, noted his son's admiration of the terrorist group and alerted the FBI.

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